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Your body houses your future in it. Everything prepared in advance. So protect it and stay firm on your values. Even the ones others deem silly! Friendships are done in close quarters across long journeys. Be identified by your joy and fixed in your beliefs, humble in the presence of those truly in need but firm in the things deemed what everyone else is doing. Your are uniquely and wonderfully made. Not all can go where your going nor do they want too. Protect your person with grace giving coverage and know that you are enough. Your memories are precious and should never torment you to want to escape it. You will choose only good things that form good memories!

Your character should be worn daily where for all to see, because if they approach you with the request to participate in some accounts you have already tripped. Make them know you by your decisions you have decided long ago. Although this may sound intense for some, realize that the things that present as tempting or interesting are only the things you did not answer in advance of the question.

https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/talk-about-drugs.html

The content below is from the kidshealth.org site with links to the author.

“Parents who are educated about the effects of drug use and learn the facts can give their kids correct information and clear up any misconceptions. You’re a role models for your kids, and your views on alcohol, tobacco, and drugs can strongly influence how they think about them. So make talking about drugs a part of your general health and safety conversations.

Preschool to Age 7

Before you get nervous about talking to young kids, take heart. You’ve probably already laid the groundwork for a discussion. For instance, whenever you give a fever medicine or an antibiotic to your child, you can discuss why and when these medicines should be given. This is also a time when your child is likely to pay attention to your behavior and guidance.

Take advantage of “teachable moments” now. If you see a character in a movie or on TV with a cigarette, talk about smoking, nicotine addiction, and what smoking does to a person’s body. This can lead into a discussion about other drugs and how they could cause harm.

Keep the tone of these discussions calm and use terms that your child can understand. Be specific about the effects of the drugs: how they make a person feel, the risk of overdose, and the other long-term damage they can cause. To give your kids these facts, you might have to do a little research.

Ages 8 to 12

As your kids grow older, you can begin talks with them by asking them what they think about drugs. By asking the questions in a nonjudgmental, open-ended way, you’re more likely to get an honest response.

Remember to show your kids that you’re listening and really paying attention to their concerns and questions.

Kids this age usually are still willing to talk openly to their parents about touchy subjects. Starting a dialogue now helps keep the door open as kids get older and are less inclined to share their thoughts and feelings.

Even if your questions don’t immediately result in a discussion, you’ll get your kids thinking about the issue. Show them that you’re willing to discuss the topic and hear what they have to say. Then, they might be more willing to come to you for help in the future.

News, such as steroid use in professional sports, can be springboards for casual conversations about current events. Use these discussions to give your kids information about the risks of drugs.

Ages 13 to 17

Kids this age are likely to know other kids who use alcohol or drugs, and to have friends who drive. Many are still willing to express their thoughts or concerns with parents about it. They may ask you more specific questions about drugs.

Use these conversations not only to understand your child’s thoughts and feelings, but also to talk about the dangers of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Talk about the legal issues — jail time and fines — and the possibility that they or someone else might be killed or seriously injured.

Consider making a written or verbal contract on the rules about going out or using the car. You can promise to pick your kids up at any time (even 2 a.m.!), no questions asked, if they call you when the person responsible for driving has been drinking or using drugs.

The contract also can detail other situations: For example, if you find out that someone drank or used drugs in your car while your son or daughter was behind the wheel, you may want to suspend driving privileges for 6 months. By discussing all of this with your kids from the start, you eliminate surprises and make your expectations clear.

Laying Good Groundwork

No parent, child, or family is immune to the effects of drugs. Any kid can end up in trouble, even those who have made an effort to avoid it and even when they have been given the proper guidance from their parents.

However, certain groups of kids may be more likely to use drugs than others. Kids who have friends who use drugs are likely to try drugs themselves. Those feeling socially isolated for whatever reason may turn to drugs. “

https://www.nemours.org/welcome.html?utm_source=khreview&utm_medium=nem&utm_campaign=rupal-gupta

Parents stay within the midst as this article points too. Do not make excuses for isolation because in there lies the chance to be isolated by the beast of the field. Be an awkward parent willing to sit in the middle so you can be the example to those who don’t have one to model. Be of steady character because you never know which little eye is watching and is in need of a healthy example. Be curious about their lives with a care as if they were your own because your voice could just be the deciding factor when risk arrives.

Kidstrive for someone to care about their present and future.

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